Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice (DGL) Supplementation for a Healthy Digestive Environment

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As many as 70 million Americans suffer from occasional heartburn and other gastrointestinal symptoms. As a result, many patients are seeking natural solutions, and research suggests that licorice root may soothe gastric upset while helping to promote a healthy digestive tract.†

Human trials have found that DGL supports a healthy mucosal lining by stimulating mucous production and enhancing the blood supply to the mucosa

According to Michael Baker, PhD, professor of medicine at the University of California, San Diego, licorice compounds support the local concentration of prostaglandins that promote mucous secretion and cell proliferation in the stomach.†

However, because licorice root contains glycyrrhizic acid, it can raise blood pressure when used on a frequent basis. Since a healthy stomach lining does not depend on glycyrrhizic acid, a specialized formula known as deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL) alleviates this risk.

Human trials have found that DGL supports a healthy mucosal lining by stimulating mucous production and enhancing the blood supply to the mucosa.† Unlike some conventional options, DGL does not suppress gastric acid, which is needed for a healthy microbial balance and for the absorption of calcium. Taken together, these findings suggest that supplementing with DGL may support a healthy mucosal lining by stimulating the stomach’s natural protective factors.†

References:

Baker ME. Licorice and enzymes other than 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase: an evolutionary perspective. Steroids. 1994;59(2):136-41.

Digestive Disease Statistics for the United States. National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC). May 2012. Available at http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/statistics/statistics.aspx

Kim JK, Oh SM, Kwon HS, et al. Anti-inflammatory effect of roasted licorice extracts on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in murine macrophages. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2006;345(3):1215-23.

Morgan AG, McAdam WA, Pacsoo C, et al. Comparison between cimetidine and Caved-S in the treatment of gastric ulceration, and subsequent maintenance therapy. Gut. 1982; 23(6): 545–551.

Turpie AG, Runcie J, Thomson TJ. Clinical trial of deglycyrrhizinized liquorice in gastric ulcer. Gut. 1969l; 10(4): 299–302.

Whiting B, Thomson TJ. Deglycyrrhizinated liquorice in duodenal ulcer. Br Med J. 1971;4(5778):48.
 

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